How does Primavera P6 calculate Planned Value Cost for Activities without linear distribution (using Resource Curves or Manual plan) in Earned Value Management

When we use Earned Value Management technique, we focus on:

  • Planned Value Cost (PV) = Budget At Completion * Schedule % Complete
  • Earned Value Cost (EV) = Budget At Completion * Performance % Complete (usually equal to Activity % Complete)
  • Schedule Variance (SV) = EV – PV
  • SV > 0 : project is good, ahead of schedule

So Planned Value Cost play a very important role here.

By default when we assign resource to activity, the unit is distributed equally (linear). Then calculation of Planned Value is as above.

However in reality, we always adjust unit for each month/week differently.

Then How ‘Planned Value’ is calculated for Activities without linear distribution, by using Resource Curves or Manual distribution?

I will explain it in this article.

We have an simple project:

The resource assignment use Back Loaded curve:

The resource curves are divided into 5% sections. Each section has a ‘Curve %’ value, so that you can specify how much actual work is to be performed in each ‘5%’ increment of the linear duration.

Shown below is an example of the default ‘Back Loaded’ curve. As you can see, between 0 and 5% of the activity duration, only 3.5% of the work is scheduled to be performed, but between 50 and 55% of the duration, 6.5% of the work is scheduled to be performed.

The activity is 10 day duration. Now let say we are at 5th day.

The calculation for “Schedule % Complete with Curve” is total all of the interval work % values.

Schedule % Complete with Curve = 3.5 + 3.5 + … + 3.5 = 35 %

PV = Schedule % Complete with Curve * BAC = 35 % * 100 = 35 $

However we can see the “Schedule % Complete” show 50%. Because it is not the “Schedule % Complete with Curve”. It is the default “Schedule % Complete” of P6 which always show linear distribution.

If we want to show “Schedule % Complete with Curve”. We can use the User Defined Field feature.

1.  Create an “Activities” User Defined Field (UDF) called “Schedule % Complete with Curve” with a Data Type of Number.

2.  Add this UDF as a column in the activities list.

3.  Create an “Activities” Global Change as follows:
Then Schedule Curve % Complete = Planned Value Cost / Budget At Completion
And Schedule Curve % Complete = Schedule Curve % Complete * 100

4.  Run Global Change and we can see the updated Schedule % Complete with Curve

 

If  we have multiple activities in WBS, and want to see the summary “Schedule % Complete with curve”, you can look at the default Schedule % Complete. Its calculation is Summary PV / Summary BAC. So it will show the right %.

How does Primavera P6 calculate Planned Value Cost for Activities with Resource Curves in Earned Value Management-11

For Activities having Both ‘Curve’ And ‘Non-Curve’ Resources
If an Activity features multiple resource assignments, some of which use Resources Curves, and some of which do not, then the Planned Value will be calculated correctly for each resource assignment, using the appropriate method, and then summed at the activity level.

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Author: Khuong Do

Khuong Do is a Project Planner in Civil, Transportation and Oil & Gas Industry. He has worked as a Primavera Consultant Specialist since 2006 . He holds a Civil Engineering degree and a Bachelor of Information Management System. Now he is working in Petronas RAPID project, one of the biggest Refinery and Petrochemical complex, in Pengerang – Malaysia.

13 thoughts on “How does Primavera P6 calculate Planned Value Cost for Activities without linear distribution (using Resource Curves or Manual plan) in Earned Value Management”

  1. Hi,
    Thank you for writing this article at a correct time (at least for me). However, in your program you have taken only one activity hence when you used Activity type as Number it does not matter. In my program there are many activities some of which do have a resource curve. In this scenario it adds up the value (since its a number) and does not give a percentage .
    I am not sure whether there is work around. If there is please do write it in your future articles. Thank you
    Viral

    1. Hi Viral,
      That’s a very interesting question.
      When you have multiple activities in WBS, and you need to see the summaried “Schedule % Complete with curve”, you can look at the default Schedule % Complete. Its calculation is Summary PV / Summary BAC

  2. In my project we have 3 types of curves, For Engineering we have front loaded, for procurement its back loaded and for construction it is Bell Shape. Each and every activity is having non labor units assigned. In this case when I am updating my schedule the Schedule % progress will still consider linear distribution or it will consider on the basis of the curve assigned? Because if planned progress is considered on the basis of resource curve assigned then i dont thik so I need to use this global change.

    Ketan

    1. Hi Ketan,
      For Activities having Both ‘Curve’ And ‘Non-Curve’ Resources
      If an Activity features multiple resource assignments, some of which use Resources Curves, and some of which do not, then the Planned Value will be calculated correctly for each resource assignment, using the appropriate method, and then summed at the activity level.

  3. very helpful.
    i want to learn more details in primavera.
    please send me your mobile number message on whatsap.
    my mobile number +919898331003.

  4. This is a second paper that I read, and second time I don’t see an illustration of the baseline schedule. This is a beauty of P6 that u can compare planned and actual values.

  5. Thanks, great information. I have a question, how do you manage variations (lets say extra scope) in the EV? do you treat them as separate or add them to the current total scope and recalculate?
    The issue is the %complete changes if you increase the units isn’t it? Do you have any example? Thanks

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